What You Need to Know About Cryptocurrency Airdrops

 What You Need to Know About Cryptocurrency Airdrops

What is a Cryptocurrency Airdrop?

In the crypto world, an airdrop is a free, often automatic distribution of cryptocurrency to a certain group of people. In this article I’ll quickly cover why airdrops happen, how you can get in on the action and receive free crypto via airdrops, and some side effects airdrops have on the crypto marketplace.

Why Give Away Cryptocurrency?

You may wonder why anyone would give cryptocurrency away for free, and that’s a good question. Here are three reasons why airdrops are a thing:

1. Airdrops act as a reward for prior participation or early adoption in a related project.

Airdrops are often distributed through an associated network or channel. A few examples:

    • Every user of the Binance cryptocurrency exchange received 500 Tron when the Tron airdrop occurred. Binance was one of the first major exchanges to list Tron.
    • OMG tokens were airdropped to every Ethereum address that had a balance over .1 ETH. The OMG token is currently an asset on the Ethereum platform.
    • All EOS holders with a balance of more than 100 EOS will receive an equal number of eosDAC tokens. eosDAC tokens will be used on of the EOS platform.

2. Airdrops spread awareness about new projects and create marketing buzz.

Airdrops can put new tokens in the hands of millions of potential users. Many of those users will read about the token, learning its use and gaining brand exposure, even if users only go on to sell the coin. This also leads to an entire community of crypto enthusiasts who try to get as much “free money” as possible by watching for and participating in airdrops.

3. Airdrops sidestep government regulation in fundraising.

In countries like the US, there is much debate about whether digital tokens are securities or not. If cryptocurrencies are treated as securities, then companies issuing crypto must follow a long list of regulations in order to raise funds by issuing digital tokens; however, distributing the tokens for free limits regulatory risk for organizations creating the tokens. This doesn’t mean token issuers won’t raise any money. Issuers who use the airdrop method will often keep 10-20% of all created tokens, which they can sell at an exchange to pay for operating costs or salaries.

How Can I Receive Free Crypto from an Airdrop?

There are a few main ways in which you can benefit from a cryptocurrency airdrop.

Own a partnered/related cryptoasset.
Many airdrops automatically send you the airdropped currency as long as you hold a certain amount of tokens at a specific time, called the snapshot.

For example,
OMG tokens were airdropped if you had at least 0.1 ETH in your account at 4:36pm on July 7th, 2017. In this case, the snapshot would be a record of all ETH account balances at that exact time. If you had enough ETH at the snapshot time, you would receive the airdropped OMG tokens, even if you sold all of your ETH the next minute.

Use a partnered service
such as a cryptocurrency exchange that will list the new token.

Register for the airdrop.
Some airdrops simply require registration of your public address, and some coins have even been airdropped as a reward for early email list subscribers.

 

Scammers have created fake airdrop registration sites. Be aware, and as always, never send anyone your private keys.Not all airdrops are the same, so make sure to read the rules and requirements for each individual airdrop. One common best practice is to have airdropped tokens sent to an account you control, not an account you have through an exchange; many exchanges may not initially support the airdropped token, meaning you wouldn’t have access to the new token until the exchange supports it.

How Can I Find Out About Airdrops?

You can find out about major upcoming events regarding crypto, including airdrops, at coinmarketcal.com, a useful cryptocurrency calendar that offers a number of search options. Or, for more airdrop-specific info, use airdropalert.com, which lists upcoming, active, and past airdrops and currency forks.

The Unintended Consequences of Airdrops

Speculation

Whenever “free” crypto is created, either by airdrop or fork, the market takes interest. Many traders will buy up the related asset needed for the airdrop, hoping to profit from the airdropped coin, and prices tend to rise as the snapshot date comes closer. Then, after the snapshot has been taken, many of those same traders will immediately sell the related asset (because they know they will receive the airdropped coin), crashing the related asset’s price. A picture-perfect example of this can be seen when ZClassic forked and all ZClassic holders received Bitcoin Private. Notice the price rise before the snapshot date, pause in trading during the snapshot, and subsequent sell-off of ZClassic. This in turn has caused speculation into buying the related asset early and then hoping to sell it for a profit just before the snapshot is taken.

Scams

A number of scams have arisen regarding airdrops, and one of the most common scams has been the creation of fake websites where you can “register” for the airdrop by sending in your private keys. Never, ever, ever give your private keys out, especially over the internet.

Conclusion

Airdrops are a great way to get some extra crypto and diversify your investments, but be careful about chasing after assets solely because you expect them to give you an airdropped coin; there is no guarantee on the value of either coin after the airdrop happens. Instead, you may want to consider investing a portion of your cryptocurrency portfolio into cryptos that are more likely to experience airdrops, such as platforms like Ethereum, Neo, EOS, etc.

Article Produced By
Block Adopter

https://blockadopter.com/cryptocurrency-airdrops/

The baroness the ICO fiasco and enter Steve Wozniak

The baroness, the ICO fiasco, and enter Steve Wozniak

Baroness Michelle Mone

Baroness Michelle Mone

Earlier this year, we brought you news that Scottish lingerie entrepreneur-turned Conservative peer Michelle Mone and her businessman boyfriend Doug Barrowman were launching an initial coin offering (ICO). The plan was to raise money for a token-based crowdfunding venture, EQUI Capital. But the project has ended in a fiasco that exposes the total absence of oversight in the ICO market, and in particular the lack of protection for those at the bottom of the crypto, er, FUDchain: “bounty-hunters” — essentially online marketers who promote ICOs on social media and across the internet, supposedly in return for digital tokens.

EQUI told us in February they hoped to raise up to $80m. Even if they raised less than that, the token offering would be “going live” no matter what, Barrowman said. Lady Mone of Mayfair, OBE, calling herself “one of the biggest experts in Cryptocurrency and Blockchain”, told Business Insider that she and Barrowman were staking their “incredible reputations” on the ICO and that there was “no way [they were] going to do anything untowards (sic) to let these people down”.

The reassurance might have been welcome, because initial coin offerings are effectively an unregulated way for companies to raise money from the public, bypassing securities laws designed to protect investors through the use of so-called cryptocurrencies. Regulators may yet step in, with those in the US indicating the rules still apply to what are securities in all but name. For now the ICO boom has prompted a flourishing in the number of businesses offering tokens, with more than $6.8bn raised so far this year alone, according to icodata.io, which tracks the market.

The EQUI ICO didn't go quite to plan, however. It isn't going live, and lots of people seem to be feeling pretty let down. (But as you will see, dear reader, we wouldn't want to say it failed, because EQUI are watching, and they're going to tell our editor, and we might get sued.) After launching a two-week pre-sale a on March 1, with a minimum required investment of $100,000, EQUI put out a press release on March 6 boasting that it had raised a nice, round $7m “in only a few days”.

Barrowman said in a statement at the time:

Trading has been frenetic, with investments ranging from the minimum hundred thousand dollar threshold up to a solid couple of million per investment.

Then, having still only apparently raised $7m on March 30, EQUI announced the “good news” that it would be extending the public ICO — minimum investment $100 — until June 30 (having originally planned to close it on April 12). By the end of June, the total amount raised still seems to have been stuck at $7m. At that point, EQUI decided to abandon the ICO idea altogether and to relaunch, on September 18, as “EQUI Global”. It is still promising to be the “ULTIMATE DISRUPTOR TO TRADITIONAL VENTURE CAPITAL INVESTING”, the logo looks the same, and the founders are pretty much the same — Mone, Barrowman plus one other “soon to be announced” (more on that below). But there is no initial coin offering.

The ICO World Of Business is a very strange place of doing business

EQUI explained, via email:

Our Founders are conventional business people with a track record of over 300 years in business between them. They have all found the ICO World Of Business a very strange place of doing business with some very alarming things going on. Therefore we will not be doing an ICO going forward and instead we will be focusing on our Token Blockchain technology.

We asked how it was possible for the founders to have a track record of “over 300 years in business” given that there were only two of them. That must have been a typo, we were told — actually that figure also includes the advisory board, of whom there are four members (apparently very sprightly-looking 90-year-olds):

Here's the breakdown of the $7m EQUI says it raised (emphasis ours):

Our short ICO raised a total of 843.33 ETH. In addition, a consortium of private investors who are known and work directly with members of the EQUI management team pledged $6 million USD. This was the $7 million that was earlier reported. A consortium of private investors who are known and work directly with members of the EQUI management team pledged $6 million USD.

It's unclear just how close the “consortium” of investors is to the EQUI management team. But the statement appears somewhat inconsistent with the earlier one about “investments ranging from the minimum hundred thousand dollar threshold up to a solid couple of million per investment”. On top of the $6m, EQUI's “short” four-month-long ICO raised ether, a popular cryptocurrency, worth about $250,000 at current rates. (At the ether rates back in March, when this $7m was first announced, the ether was worth about $700,000.)

When we suggested that according to their numbers, no money at all had been raised between the “frenetic trading” of early March and June 30, we were told that the pre-sale had in fact raised “between $6.5m and $7m”, and that the 843.33 ether had been raised in the public sale. Thus the $7m originally announced grew to… $7m. Rounding, huh. Barrowman told FT Alphaville when we spoke to him earlier this year that he had spent a “seven-figure” sum on the project since beginning in summer 2017, though it's wasn't exactly clear what that money referred to. Either way, the paltry $7m EQUI had raised — less than 10 per cent of its target —

then started to ebb further. Here's EQUI:

At the time of stopping our ICO, we at EQUI did something that very few ICOs or projects do when they change the project fundamentals. We offered full refunds to those that wanted to rethink their investment into the project. While fewer than 40 investors took us up on this offer, the consortium, brought in privately has pulled back their $6 million investment as they are waiting to reassess the project and changes that are actively being made. This is to ensure compliance with regulatory guidelines of the fundamentals of EQUItoken and its potential classification by the regulatory boards governing the EQUI project as a security.

A total of 57.8 ETH was returned to investors who requested a refund. This means that a total of 785.53 ETH was raised via the ICO. 

Some were refunded without their consent. When we asked about this, someone who wanted to be described only as an “insider” told us that first of all investors were told they would be refunded. But, as not all of them had wanted a refund, the “sophisticated investors” were allowed to stay on, while the others were refunded, the insider said. It is these sophisticated investors who will now be allowed to participate in the new EQUI venture which, as we've seen, focuses on “Token Blockchain Technology”, but is strictly not an ICO according to the company.

The reason for the change in tack after the wildly successful and not in any way failed ICO, our insider told us, is that — as has been reported in the crypto-press — an Apple co-founder called Steve Wozniak is to join the company, and will become EQUI's third co-founder. He didn't want to be part of an ICO, and “he’s come up with a different way of doing it”, we were told. Woz told CNBC in June that he wanted bitcoin to become the single global currency because “that is so pure thinking” (the whole video is worth a watch).

The most miserable cryptojob of them all

A dispute has broken out — reported first by Scottish politics site Wings over Scotland — over how much the “bounty-hunters” we mentioned before should be paid, given that the ICO no longer appears to be going ahead. It highlights another aspect of the ICO world. Unlike, say, the highly legalistic prospectuses produced for securities offerings in the traditional financial system, the legal status of the promotional documents associated with coin and token offerings remains untested.

In EQUI's original “White Paper” it was written, under “token distribution”, that “2 per cent will be available for Bounty Rewards”, with a pie chart to illustrate that as a proportion of the total supply: Given that the price of one of these tokens was $0.50 and there were to be 250m tokens, bounty-hunters say they were expecting to share a pool of $2.5m, and indeed this is what was said in EQUI's

Bitcointalk group for bounty-hunters:

A total of 2% ($2.5M) of the total token supply will be assigned to the Bounty Pool.

EQUI say they were not responsible for the post but we understand that it was reviewed by them before it was posted by the company managing the bounty programme, as is standard practice. In a later Bitcointalk post, we find similar wording: “A total of 2 per cent (5,000,000 EQUI) of the total token supply will be assigned to the Bounty Pool.” But EQUI seem to be a bit confused about what that 2 per cent meant.

They told us, via email:

The Bounty community only raised $2,000 between them all and should only be getting paid out $40.00 but as a gesture of goodwill we have decided to pay them out on the full amount raised after eu finds [sic — we think they mean refunds] which is over $10,000.

As such, 2% of this amount was originally promised to the bounty pool, this is our legal contract with the Bounty agency. This constitutes a bounty pool of 15.71 ETH. We at EQUI are 100% transparent and will offer complete records and TXID’s to verify this. As it was EQUI’s decision to stop our ICO to show appreciation for Bounty hunters hard work and dedication to the project we will be increasing the reward for the bounty payout from 2% to 5%.

So in the first paragraph, they tell us that the bounty-hunters raised just $2,000 between them, and that they should therefore only be given $40 to divide between themselves (2 per cent of $2,000). That seems strange; bounty-hunters are not meant to be “raising” money per se. Rather, they are effectively online street teams — typically from low-income regions of the world — who are paid a certain amount of tokens for each task they perform, such as sharing promotional tweets and posts on social media, adding their logo to their online “signatures”, creating videos and writing puff pieces for the ICO they are toiling on behalf of.

But EQUI says all the money it raised except for $2,000 — again a nice round number, which is apparently an “estimate” — came from its own contacts, and that therefore the bounty-hunters should really only get a share of this tiny amount. Confusingly though, in the second paragraph above, EQUI seems to be saying it had a “legal contract” in which they promise that 2 per cent of the total raised after refunds — so the 785.33 ether — should go to the bounty-hunting pool. That would be 15.71 ether, currently worth just over $4,000. But as a “gesture of good will”, they've decided to increase that to just under 40 ether, or about $11,000.

Because of lax KYC checks in such schemes and therefore the possibility that people register more than once, it is difficult to know how many real people were involved in this bounty-hunting effort. EQUI say between 1,000 and 1,500 while AmaZix — the company that was originally managing the bounty programme but who stopped working with Equi back in May, citing “irreconcilable differences” — said there were 7,600 unique usernames in the bounty. Either way, $11,000 doesn't seem like a very big pool to share among them.

“Police can track you down”

We spoke to several of EQUI's bounty-hunters and were shown Telegram messages. When they complained about the amount there were getting paid or the way they were being treated, EQUI threatened them with lawyers if they “bad-mouthed” the company. One Telegram message sent to a group of bounty hunters said “police can track you down if you threaten & track and bad mouth our brand name”; another sent the same day said “you are all so stupid”. EQUI declined to comment on the messages. That a peer of the realm's business appears to have threatened criminal consequences for people encouraged to take part in its unregulated investment scheme is, if nothing else, a bad look.

One bounty-hunter, Maksim Koselev, a 29-year-old Russian warehouse worker, told us he had spent about 10 to 15 minutes per day, seven days a week, promoting EQUI online for the months during which the ICO was running, which included writing two promotional articles about the company in Russian. He's worked as a bounty-hunter for more than 100 ICOs, he said, and apart from the exit scams — where those raising money disappear with the funds they have raised — this is the worst experience he's ever had. He, and others, said bounty-hunters should have been paid 2 per cent of the $7m Equi raised, particularly given that EQUI is still planning to raise money from investors.

He told us:

We’ve been thrown out of the window with this… This is not the way you talk, even to bounty-hunters. They treat people like nothing.

Our experience of interacting with EQUI has also been a bit… strange. When we contacted the company via its website we were replied to by Baroness Mone's press officer, who offered us a “deal on an exclusive”. When we asked some questions about the bounty-hunters' complaints, we were told that “anything that is written that is defamatory to EQUI or our founders we will take severe action”. Not only did Equi copy in their lawyers, but all this came with a “UK parliament disclaimer” at the bottom, a nice reminder this was a member of the upper house of the British parliament we were dealing with.

EQUI's solicitor Paul Tweed — a celebrity media lawyer so renowned that the New York Times dedicated a whole story to him earlier this year, who has represented everyone from Sylvester Stallone to, er, Britney Spears — was copied in conspicuously to emails, as was Egg Media, a PR company “specialising in crisis management, corporate brand and individual reputation”. These are well-connected people who seem to know what they're doing and don't appear to be struggling for cash.

“We are watching your every move”

In an email on Monday, we were told:

All Bounty people have now been paid from their agreed contract from 2% to 5% as a gesture of goodwill.

To check the bounty participants had received the cash, we sent a message to the Telegram support group asking if members had received anything. We were told no one had yet been paid, as it turned out. EQUI later said it had paid the money to a third party, who will distribute this to bounty-hunters shortly. But straight after we'd sent the message to the group, things got creepier. EQUI Support got in touch on Telegram with the following:

We at Alphaville have a history of frustration over the baroness's media team's antics, but telling us that our every move was being watched kind of felt like another level. We look forward to learning how EQUI Global can be relaunched in a way which isn’t an ICO, given its business model was built around the tokens it hoped to sell. It seems that yet another Conservative parliamentarian has learned that dipping one's (cryp)toes into the murky waters of ICOs can be a rough experience.

Article Produced By
Jemima Kelly

Jemima Kelly joined FT Alphaville in April 2018. Before that she wrote about the foreign exchange market, cryptocurrencies, and fintech at Reuters. She also had stints there writing about the asset management industry and pensions. She covered the BP oil spill from Louisiana, and the Brexit reverberations from a muddy field in Glastonbury.

She got her start by sneaking into The Economist as a “corrector”, then moonlighting as a reporter, travelling to Myanmar to write about its literal and political landmines. She once perused every issue of The Sun between 1979 and 1990 for her history dissertation, “What a pair! Page Three and the Thatcher Years”. Before university she pursued a career in music. She still sings and writes songs. Jemima is interested in cryptoeconomics (sorry), technology, philanthropy, the ideas industry and pseudo-religions, index investing, and the media.

https://ftalphaville.ft.com/2018/09/03/1535947200000/The-baroness–the-ICO-fiasco–and-enter-Steve-Wozniak-/

Cryptocurrency airdrop What is a crypto airdrop?

Cryptocurrency airdrop | What is a crypto airdrop?

Welcome to the future,

where you can create money from nothing! Well not nothing. But it certainly feels like it. Indeed, these days you see dozens of crypto airdrops. And many people are now looking to get free token everywhere. Because it’s free of course, it’s made from air. So what is a cryptocurrency airdrop?

What is a crypto airdrop?

Let’s start with the airdrop cryptocurrency meaning. A? ?crypto airdrop, short of cryptocurrency airdrop,? ?is? ?an event during which ?a? ?coin project distribute?s?? ?tokens or? ?coins to? early adopters, ?for free. And there aren’t many requirements to get the free tokens or coins. But you may have to give up a little bit of privacy… Universa.io for example, was asking users to share their Facebook contact list for example. Or POW Token was asking to create a post about their coin airdrop. Also, you may have to have coins from the specified blockchain in your wallet. OmiseGo, which made a very popular airdrop, required participants to have Ethereum for example. A coin airdrop may be done on any blockchain. But the most popular ones are bitcoin and ethereum.

Beware of scams!

Anyone can offer a crypto-airdrop, and that includes unscrupulous people. If a developer asks for your private keys, don’t share anything. Otherwise your coins will be stolen!

How does a cryptocurrency airdrop works?

Now that you know the crypto airdrop meaning, how does it actually work? Airdrops are a brand new format to distribute tokens in the crypto world. And there’s no standard rules yet. Maybe in the future, with the increasing popularity. But right now, each team offers a different set of rules. Despite a few websites displaying the rules, you may have to contact the developer directly to learn more.

Midas’ touch

You should register to bitcointalk forum to keep updated about crypto airdrops, or even apply to some of them. And make sure you’re an active member with a few posts. Because the developer may decide to kick out the noobs…In the case where you need to have specific coins in your wallet, the dev team will make a photo of the corresponding blockchain. And people holding the cryptocurrency in their wallet at that time will be entitled to get the tokens. While sometimes you may get the tokens automatically, you could also have to claim them on the project’s website.For the airdrops on social media, you may have to share or retweet the link of the project. Therefore, you may need a certain number of followers to be eligible. Some developers also require to share your contact details.

Surprise airdrops, really?

This is the best part! Indeed, you may have received some free coins, without even knowing it. I mean until you check your wallet. Because some platforms did give away some tokens to the users holding some of their coins, just like that. I’d recommend you to hold a little bit of each coin, at least the most popular ones. Because the more coins in your portfolio, the more freebies you can get!

Why TF do people give away free tokens?

To raise awareness for their crypto-currency project, of course. Indeed, it’s free advertising too. And to create a community around it. Because if you give some coins to a user, he’ll get involved to make it bankable. Finally, to cause the new currency to appreciate. Finally, it could be also to create a lead database for a cheap price. Indeed, these companies collect all the data they can in exchange of a few worthless tokens… You know the saying: If you’re not paying for it, you’re the produtc!

What to do with my airdropped coins?

Youhou, you got some free coins! But what now? Well, at the beginning there’s nothing much to do. Because nobody knows this currency… And it’s not even available in the exchanges. Sure, you can receive and send some coins with your friends, but what for? Despite the value the project announces, it’s really worth nothing. It becomes interesting when the new crypto arrives in the exchanges. And you can know the real price of what you got. The chance is that most people want to sell their coins, to get “real” money from it. So the price may not be up to your expectations… But you don’t have to sell your free crypto, you can hold it and use it later.

How do I keep my new cryptocoins safe?

First of all, you need a crypto wallet, to be able to receive, hold and send the new crypto. Then you have to own the private keys to your coins & tokens. Otherwise they’re not yours, period. Also, you can share your crypto address, to receive your cryptocurrency airdrop. But you must never share your private key! If you do, someone will steal your coins, for sure.

Article Produced By
Best Bitcoin Alternative

https://bestbitcoinalternative.com/resources/cryptocurrency-airdrop/

Bitcoin To 96000 XRP To 001 By 2023 ICO Advisor Satis Group Estimates

Bitcoin To $96,000, XRP To $0.01 By 2023, ICO Advisor Satis Group Estimates

What bear market?

Despite downward pressure on the price of bitcoin for most of 2018, ICO advisory firm Satis Group sees bitcoin's value proposition and market depth as strong vis-a-vis other crypto assets, and is estimating that its price could hit $96,000 by 2023 and $144,000 by 2028. The predictions come in a new report on crypto asset valuation in which overall crypto market capitalization is estimated to grow from approximately $170 billion currently to $3.6 trillion over the next ten years. Despite the broader bitcoin and crypto bullishness, the report’s predictions for tokens like Bitcoin Cash, XRP and application-specific utility tokens are quite downcast.

The authors see BCH trending down to $268 in five years’ time and forecast minimal traction for “cryptoassets which attempt to inherit brand recognition and provide minimal technological advantage to incumbents.” Ripple’s XRP token, predicted to fall to $0.01 by 2023, doesn't get much love either, with the authors seeing “Little value in XRP and cryptoassets which are misleadingly marketed, not needed within their own network, and have centralized ownership/validation.”

The report’s outlook on so-called utility tokens was is also less than optimistic. While the authors foresee application-specific tokens ultimately penetrating markets like information technology spending, gaming and gambling, the ability of these tokens to hold or increase

in value is limited:

“(T)he high velocity of these applications combined with a lack of value-retaining construct will result in them either: 1) being not used and sinking in value, or 2) having high use, and in turn lower value as a result of the high velocity.”

Across all crypto asset sectors, Satis Group is most heavily bullish on privacy coins such as Monero – which it estimates will increase to $18,500 by 2023. “Although (p)rivacy networks are newer entrants, we believe the network effects seen from the likes of BTC earlier on will be repeated within dominant coins here,”

the report notes, adding:

“Not only do these coins target the same large and lower velocity store of value market as BTC and (c)urrencies, they present a much deeper value proposition within those markets.”

Upward price pressure for these currencies will come from global geopolitical events like capital controls, currency devaluations and other financial turmoil. “The use cases within the (p)rivacy markets are incredibly sticky and feed on adoption, especially when regulators and law enforcement are making efforts to increase forensic penetration into public networks like BTC."

Article Produced By

Aaron Stanley

I write about business and regulatory aspects of blockchain and crypto. I am strategic communications lead at Sweetbridge, a company that is building a blockchain protocol stack for supply chains and commerce. I most recently served as Washington correspondent for CoinDesk, where I covered the business applications and legal and regulatory aspects of blockchain technology and cryptocurrencies. Prior to that, I spent four years in the Financial Times Washington bureau, where I helped cover politics, regulation, trade and business enterprise for the print and online editions, as well as specialty publications like FT Wealth, EM Squared, beyondbrics, Business Life and FT Weekend. I've also been extensively published in casino gaming trade publications, including GamblingCompliance, CDC Gaming Reports and Global Gaming Business. I hold an M.A. in International Commerce and Policy from George Mason University in Fairfax, VA and a B.A. in Social Sciences from The College of St. Scholastica in Duluth, MN.

https://www.forbes.com/sites/astanley/2018/08/31/bitcoin-to-96000-xrp-to-0-01-by-2023-ico-advisor-satis-group-estimates/#7c8683681490

What do you think about crypto airdrops? Are they profitable?

What do you think about crypto airdrops? Are they profitable?

 

If you are a fan of action movies just like myself,

then the first image that comes to mind whenever ‘airdrop’ is mentioned, may be airplanes dropping war machines or relief materials out of the sky. However, this is far from what it means in the cryptocurrency space. I bet you’ve been seeing the word [airdrops] attached to a lot of cryptocurrencies, and particularly ICO projects. So, what really is an airdrop, in relation to cryptos?

An airdrop is a distribution of pre-mined coins (cryptos) to early supporters of a project. Think of it, like free coins waiting to be picked up for doing close to nothing. Yes, that’s right. Getting free cryptocurrencies from airdrops requires little to no effort. As crazy as this may sound, many crypto enthusiasts are making money from airdrops. And while it may appear illogical for companies to throw some cash away in the name of airdrops, the entire process is actually a core marketing strategy. After all, nothing is free.

Blockchain-based businesses, new and old, often use airdrops as a means to create some buzz about their projects, or reward loyal HODLERS/supporters. The idea of getting some money for simply inputting your email, joining a Telegram group, and performing some basic tasks like twitting about a project sounds interesting. We all like easy money, don’t we? In the process of doing this, we unknowingly let out some of our details such as email, Facebook or Twitter username, and probably phone number. It’s a win-win for both parties.

Getting Airdrops

Airdrops are free money. To participate in them, you’ll need the following:

  • An active Ethereum wallet (most airdrops are ERC20 tokens, although they can come in other forms, so you may need another wallet as specified by the company)
  • Telegram/Twitter/Facebook account (basically, you will be required to perform an easy task, which could involve downloading an app)
  • Email address

That’s as simple as it gets. Next is to find out which projects are doing airdrops, join up, and perform the required tasks. Tasks typically range from just filing a user form (with your Ethereum wallet), twitting about the project, liking and commenting on Facebook, or performing a video review, amongst others. For a list of latest airdrops in the crypto space, visit All Crypto airdrops rated for you and join the mailing list. It’s as simple as ABC.

Article Produced By

Nadim Ahmeed

https://www.quora.com/What-do-you-think-about-crypto-airdrops-Are-they-profitable

Colorado’s ICO Task Force’ Levies Orders Against 3 Crypto Startups

Colorado’s ‘ICO Task Force’ Levies Orders Against 3 Crypto Startups


Colorado Securities Commissioner Gerald Rome
has issued signed orders to show cause that three cryptocurrency businesses have allegedly offered and promoted unregistered ICOs in Colorado.The investigation is part of a recent crackdown against fraudulent ICOs by officials of the Division of Securities under Colorado State’s Department Of Regulatory Agencies (DORA).

‘ICO Task Force’ Targets Project Marketing Fake Forbes Partnership

The officials are part of an “ICO Task Force” put together in May by Commissioner Rome with the mandate of identifying individuals and companies with fraudulent or unregistered businesses that present their customers with an investment risk. The three companies that are subject to the latest order are Bionic Coin, Sybrelabs Ltd., also known as CryptoARB, and Global Pay Net, also known as GLPN Coin and GPN Token.

Similar orders have previously been received by Bitcoin Investments Ltd., also known as DB Capital, EstateX, Bitconnect, and Magma Foundation, also known as Magma Coin. Bionic Coin promotes an ICO known as “Bionic” or “BNC,” and it promises to enable instant cross-border payments to anyone, as well as simplify the process of buying software and electronic devices. The ICO site offers investment-related information about the ICO including a timeline roadmap, a technical whitepaper, and FAQs.

It also makes promises of returns to investors, saying, “Bionic will grow your money without any effort.” On the site, a number of purported media partners are listed including Forbes magazine, but upon investigation it was discovered that no such reference to the company exists on any of the sites it listed. Users are also incentivized to promote the ICO on their social media accounts with promises of receiving up to 10,000 BNC tokens per post. Most significantly, the site has no associated physical address or control person identified.

‘Cryptoarbitrage Robot’

Sybrelabs Ltd., which claims to be based in Cambridgeshire, England, promotes an unregistered security in the form of an investment pool that allows users to trade on cryptocurrency exchanges through what is termed a “cryptoarbitrage robot.” According to Sybrelabs, this is a tool that allows the company to “automate many factors occurring with effective arbitrage on several instruments.” It offers huge profit percentages for a minimum participation of $25.00, and it solicits “active investment portfolios” of $25,000 or more. Like Bionic Coin, it encourages members to promote the scheme and its website also provides marketing materials including a PDF presentation, online banners, and souvenir products.

Global Pay Net markets an ICO purporting to sell “GLPN Coins,” which allegedly provide a blockchain-based international financial platform. It claims that GLPN tokens are “full-value assets that represent one’s share in the business” and that “investors receive 80 percent of the company’s profits.” Multiple cryptocurrency professionals and personalities are listed on the site, purportedly as having involvement in the project, but two of them have denied that this is the case.

It also claims that it has a filing with the SEC’s EDGAR database, but this cannot be verified because the phone number listed for the 2011 filing is disconnected, and no business filing is registered in Washington State where the company is supposedly located. Like the other two, it also offers inducements for individuals to promote it using their personal social media accounts, and it provides marketing materials on its website. Earlier, CCN reported that “Operation Cryptosweep,” an initiative of the North American Securities Administrators Association (NASAA), is actively investigating over 200 ICOs across the continent.

Article Produced By
Bitcoin Crime

https://www.ccn.com/colorados-ico-task-force-levies-orders-against-3-crypto-startups/

An 8 Million Airdrop Ran Out of Tokens What’s Next Is Anyone’s Guess

 

An $8 Million Airdrop Ran Out of Tokens – What's Next Is Anyone's Guess

"Scarcity" may be a crypto buzzword,

but "shortage" has hardly made the footnotes – until now. In early July, the developers behind U Network, a blockchain publishing protocol valued at around $8 million, abruptly announced that it had run out of its reserve of UUU crypto tokens, and that it planned to buy back some of the supply it distributed to early investors through its airdrop in February.

At the start of the project, U Network established a 10 billion UUU cap on its token supply (worth approximately $15.6 million), setting aside 40 percent of its total tokens (about $6.2 million) for the founding team and future development. Yet, due to a rising number of strategic partners and interest in its token, the project announced on Medium, "The demand for UUU tokens has exceeded our current designated holdings."

The post continued:

"The team now faces a problem: leaving our ecosystem tokens intact, how do we pursue these new opportunities to grow the U Network ecosystem?"

The result is a problem that seems to have little precedent. The structure of ICOs and airdrops varies widely across projects, particularly with regard to the number of tokens minted, distributed and maintained by a given company or non-profit. While some projects do not limit the number of tokens that can be created within their blockchain ecosystem, others, like U Network, choose to implement a cap on the total supply.

For U Network, the 10 billion limit was implemented because the content-centered project, which aims to "help online content platforms better align with the interests of their users," wanted to "provide sufficient incentives to community members." While U Network's dilemma is currently an outlier in the industry, other blockchains that have implemented hard caps on their ICOs and airdrops may soon find themselves in a similar quandary as they begin building their ecosystems. Likewise, U Network's situation may force similar projects to confront an even more difficult question: what happens when your startup runs out of its own tokens?

Method to the madness

Incentives are especially important in blockchain systems, and so far, there is no established methodology by which projects can determine how many tokens to issue and keep. That's according to Joshua Gans, a professor of strategic management at the University of Toronto, who told CoinDesk: "There is no metric." "If you want to use tokens for incentives, the amount of the incentive is dependent on the price of the token," he explained. "At the start, it is hard to predict that." Gans added that establishing the amount of tokens projects should keep is equally as unsystematic.

According to Catherine Tucker, a professor of management and marketing at MIT, projects face a doubly difficult situation in the highly scrutinized industry. Not only do they lack methodologies for determining token supplies and holdings, they must also consider the perception of their actions. "I think this case illustrates the huge trade-offs founders face," she told CoinDesk. "If they keep too many tokens in reserve, they are often accused of being greedy. But if they give away too many tokens then they lose a crucial lever they need to incentivize people to use their platform or service in the future."

The buy-back

As such, remedying a shortage of tokens looks to be a precarious task. Solutions such as increasing the token supply of the network could influence the token's price, angering investors and jeopardizing their trust in the project. So instead, U Network plans to refurbish its holdings by conducting a token "buy-back." In practice, this means it will re-purchase 1,000 ETH worth of UUU (about 284 million tokens at press time) from current token holders over the course of several stages.

"For the first stage we would be buying back 200 ETH worth of UUU between the price range of 0.004 and 0.005 USD," U Network told CoinDesk. At press time, one UUU token was valued at $0.001569. As for how the project determined the number of tokens to re-purchase, it explained, "We believe it's a reasonable amount. Not too high to affect market price, not too low to affect the expansion needs."

From Gans' perspective, the buy-back is "a good way to go." He went on, "You issue the tokens and retain some other currency to use for buy-backs if you make an error. The other option is to give yourself the ability to issue more tokens for incentive purposes but that is ultimately the same as retaining some tokens at the outset." And as for what the rest of the industry could do to avoid U Network's dilemma,

MIT's Tucker suggested:

"If I had to give advice to founders, it would be to think about the uncertainty involved with the project. In those cases of heightened uncertainty, it might be best to limit the initial distribution of tokens until the business plan has evolved and been tested."

Article Produced By
Annaliese Milano

https://www.coindesk.com/8-million-airdrop-cryptocurrency-run-out-tokens/

NASAA launches an investigation into over 200 allegedly fraudulent ICOs

NASAA launches an investigation into over 200 allegedly fraudulent ICOs

Not the NASA you were thinking about

The days of the pump and dump ICO may be numbered

: the North American Securities Administrators Association (NASAA) is on the warpath, taking action against potentially dodgy cryptocurrency schemes. In an announcement made yesterday, NASAA revealed it has opened over 200 cases investigating possibly illegitimate, illegal, and fraudulent ICOs and cryptocurrency related businesses since its launch in May 2018. All under the codename “Operation Cryptosweep.”

NASAA is a collective task force made up of representatives from the US, Canada, Mexico, Puerto Rico, and the US Virgin Islands. Its aim is to uncover illegitimate cryptocurrency scams, and protect potential unwitting investors. “State and provincial securities regulators are committing significant regulatory resources to protect investors from financial harm involving fraudulent ICOs and cryptocurrency-related investment products and also are raising awareness among industry participants of their regulatory responsibilities,” said NASAA President and Alabama Securities Commission Director Joseph P. Borg, in the announcement.

The point NASAA makes is that, if cryptocurrencies qualify as securities then they must be subject to, and apply for specific regulatory certification, or they must apply for exemption. Either way they must acknowledge this regulatory process in some way, the reality is, many do not. A full list of all those being investigated as part of “Operation Cryptosweep” can be seen here. It seems the primary reason for investigation is due to selling “unregistered securities.” The rise of the ICO presents a challenging future for cryptocurrency investors, and the general public alike. With a widely unregulated field, there are few safeguards to protect investors from dodgy scams.

At Hard Fork we recently reported how most of the top 100 cryptocurrencies don’t actually have a working product, giving investors no return for their money. What’s more, cryptocurrency exit scams exist, which specifically aim to raise money and run. They’ve illegitimately taken over $100 million from investors. Supposed regulation is one of blockchain and cryptocurrency’s most challenging issues right now. Whether for or against great control of our digital assets, hopefully “Operation Cryptosweep” will help to legitimize the field, and weed out the crooks.

Article Produced By

Matthew Beedham

https://thenextweb.com/hardfork/2018/08/29/operation-cryptosweep-ico-cleanup/

CryptoCurrency Airdrops: Where Could The SEC Stand on Them?

CryptoCurrency Airdrops:
Where Could The SEC Stand on Them?

We are all aware of the common practice in the cryptocurrency ecosystem called Airdrops.

These are essentially free giveaways of coins that are “airdropped” on a group of cryptocurrency enthusiasts. It is the quickest way to distribute your coins in the market short of doing an Initial Coin Offering (ICO). However, how do Airdrops fit into the current regulatory framework as laid out by the Securities and Exchange Commission? Could airdrops be a less burdensome way for the developers to fund their projects? We will take a look at the current regulatory environment and how cryptocurrency airdrops are likely to fit into that.

How Airdrops Work

The mechanics of an Airdrop is really pretty simple. A developer team will take a snapshot of an already established cryptocurrency chain. This will then give them an overview of the addresses that are currently on the chain. They will then release their free tokens to all of those holders. The developers of that token will “fork” their chain from the legacy chain and then build off of that technology. Some of the largest cryptocurrencies available right now are the result of these including Bitcoin Cash (BCH).

It is also really quite simple to initiate an airdrop. For example, you can head on over to Open Zeppelin and use one of their smart contract templates for the the Ethereum blockchain. You will then take a snapshot of the blockchain and you will distribute a certain number of the coins in some sort of a ratio to the ETH that they already hold. The developers will also hold onto a certain percentage of all available coins.

Why Airdrop Coins?

Apart from distributing your coins as widely as possible, there are other really important incentives for a project to airdrop coins. It is an easy way for the developer team to fund their project. Yes, they are not raising crypto or Fiat through an ICO or a seed round, but they are keeping a large stake in the coins that they have airdropped.

If the project keeps doing well and the public starts to take notice then the value of the tokens is likely to increase. Hence, the team funds will become valuable and they can then sell some of these tokens to fund the project in question. They are also a lot more cost effective than completing an ICO or trying to secure funding in a seed round. These methods of financing are now becoming incredibly expensive as investors are demanding much more than a simple whitepaper. Airdrops could also be less burdensome in terms of regulation.

Securities Regulations and Crypto

If a cryptocurrency asset is classified as a security then it falls under the jurisdiction of the SEC and hence will have to meet all the requirements. Whether it is classified as such depends on whether it passes the Howey Test. This is the rule of thumb that is used to determine whether an asset will be classified as a security. More particularly, an investment contract is

defined as:

A contract, transaction or scheme whereby a person invests his money in a common enterprise and is led to expect profits solely from the efforts of the promoter or a third party

Under this definition, it is quite clear that many of the ICOs today could be classified as such. In fact, there was even speculation that Ethereum may have been classified as a security when they did their ICO. Yet, how are the airdrops viewed by the SEC?

Airdrops And Securities

Not surprisingly, there is no legal precedent for giveaways.Airdrops are free giveaways of the coins and the ICO developers are not raising funds from the population. The investors are not putting any funds at risk and hence they cannot claim that they had expectations of a return on their investment.However, what about the cases when the tokens eventually hit the market and secondary investors buy the tokens on an exchange? Here they are indeed buying these tokens in the expectation of a profit.

While they may be expecting a return on their investment, can they really be classified as investing in a “common enterprise”? Are these investors not just speculating on the price of an asset much like they will do when the purchase Forex, Commodities or even other cryptocurrencies such as Bitcoin. Moreover, can this really even be considered investing? Tokens are not like equity in a company or debt securities. Many of them are “utility tokens” meaning that they have an underlying use case. Hence, one can realistically claim that they are buying the token for a purpose other than speculation.

Those who are buying the tokens on an exchange are buying it from other people and not from the developers themselves. Hence, you cannot claim that the developers are the main recipients of the investors’ funds. All this means that it would be incredibly nonsensical for the SEC to claim that an airdrop is a security. This could be akin to them claiming a free giveaway of any good on the street can also be considered a security. Moreover, what will the SEC do to those coins that have already been airdropped and have no central authority? Who will they target in any sort of enforcement action when the network is decentralised?

Conclusion

Airdrops are a quick and easy way for developers to get their coins out into the ecosystem and start work on the project. The SEC has still not given their judgement on ICOs yet but many think that it is only a matter of time. Indeed, it seems that they are getting that much more active with their enforcement. There have been a number of ICOs that have received cease and desist letters in operation “crypto sweep”.

So, should airdrops be the preferred option? Not quite.

While they are less burdensome, an airdrop is much less effective of an fundraising method as an ICO or other methods of seed funding. The development team will still have to wait before there is any sort of market for their coins before they can sell some and use the proceeds. Building ground breaking technology is not cheap and these developers still have to put food on the table. In the end, it will have to come down to the needs, preferences and risk that the developers are willing to take.

Article Produced By
Editorial Team

Editors at large. Posting the latest news, reviews and analysis to hit the blockchain.

https://www.coinbureau.com/analysis/cryptocurrency-airdrops-sec/

 

SIX Group Executive Questions Launch of Crypto Trading Expresses ICO Optimism Instead

SIX Group Executive Questions Launch of Crypto Trading, Expresses ICO Optimism Instead

Thomas Zeeb, CEO of securities services

at Switzerland’s top stock exchange SIX, revealed that the firm is unlikely to launch crypto trading, Business Insider reported August 17. According to Zeeb, cryptocurrencies are really “not a priority” at the moment, taking into account the fact that there are a number of other platforms that provide Bitcoin (BTC) trading services. Moreover, Zeeb noted that there are still some "reputational" issues surrounding Bitcoin, also suggesting that Bitcoin is all about “hope and hype.”

However, the head of securities services at top Switzerland’s stock exchange expressed optimism about the concept of digital assets. Zeeb stated that digitals coins such as Initial Coin Offering (ICO) tokens are “here to stay,” with its mass adoption coming in around “five years.” In the interview with Business Insider, Zeeb compared digital currencies with derivatives trading, claiming that he is "absolutely convinced" that crypto is "where derivatives were in the early '90s." According to Zeeb, digital assets’ adoption will come “a lot faster than the 30 years it's taken derivatives.”

Zeeb said that the upcoming digital assets exchange — currently being developed by SIX — aims to introduce a regulation-focused way of trading ICO tokens in order to enable participation by institutional investors. He stressed that that the main task of the exchange would be filling the gap between crowdfunding and ICOs, which is now usually taken up by venture capital or private equity.

Zeeb stated,

"There is demand from institutional clients to find a way to legitimize and bring asset safety into play.”

Speaking to Business Insider, Zeeb encouraged the digitization of existing securities or exchange-traded funds due to the ability to enable fractional ownership, citing the benefits of turning some exotic assets such as art galleries collections to tokens. In early July, SIX Group first officially announced its plans to launch a “fully-regulated” cryptocurrency exchange next year using blockchain technology to create a “digital asset ecosystem. Later in July, SIX also revealed it has started considering the possibility of launching crypto trading services on its trading platform, which is set to be launched by mid-2019.

Article Produced By
Helen Partz

Helen is passionate about learning languages, cultures and the Internet. She has years of experience working at international online advertising projects. Growing interested in Bitcoin and cryptocurrencies in late 2017, she joined Cointelegraph as a writer.

https://cointelegraph.com/news/six-group-executive-questions-launch-of-crypto-trading-expresses-ico-optimism-instead